West community debates senioritis

Senior Mason Gervich takes a nap during his fourth hour study hall.

Hasan Baig

Senior Mason Gervich takes a nap during his fourth hour study hall.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






He does not bother to pick up a textbook unless it’s time to study for a big test. He does not do any homework until the class before when it is collected and graded for completion. And he always relies on his classmates to bail him out on class projects worth a significant chunk of the grade. He is a student suffering from a bad case of senioritis.

Senioritis only exists in students with lazy attitudes, not willing to do any work. It’s time for seniors to put away thoughts of going to college in August 2016 and focus on present time left.

Freshmen, sophomores and juniors must be careful about keeping up with their grades, doing their homework and staying up-to-date with their assignments. If not, something happens when the student approaches senior year.

“Freshman, sophomore and junior year I was really focused on getting good grades to boost my GPA,” senior Collin Basler said. “In senior year, I don’t think my GPA really matters anymore because I feel like people already know where they are going [to college]. If we get accepted into the college we want to go to then we won’t want to work as hard and have fun for the rest of senior year.”

According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling in 2009, 22 percent of colleges across the United States revoked admission offers; final grades being responsible for 65.3 percent of the revocations.

“Knowing that my application can get revoked, I have been trying to work as hard as I have worked my last three years,” senior Nik Kebrdle said. “I am trying to get into UMKC and if I do not maintain a stable GPA and have it drop drastically, I know for a fact that my application will get revoked.”

Based on the research conducted by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, senioritis threatens student’s future academic success by getting their applications denied or revoked by the colleges that they want to go to, resulting in them going to less prestigious colleges and not get a solid opportunity to get a good job. Parkway West’s College and Career Counselor Kate Christensen agreed that senioritis can affect a student’s academic future.

“Students need to know that colleges receive their transcript at the end of the year so they need to make sure that they finish the year strong and keep up their good grades,” Christensen said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email