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Handing+a+snow+cone+to+a+customer%2C+employee+and+junior+Audrey+DeYoung+fulfills+her+childhood+dream+of+working+at+Tropical+Sno+Manchester%2C+where+she+makes+minimum+wage.+To+reach+a+teenage+demographic%2C+DeYoung+and+her+coworker+created+the+Instagram+account+%40trosnomanchester+in+hopes+of+having+more+teenagers+drop+by+as+customers.+%E2%80%9CWhat+drew+me+to+it+was+that+it%E2%80%99s+such+a+little+shack+and+kind+of+a+unique+job+to+have%2C%E2%80%9D+DeYoung+said.+%E2%80%9CEveryone+I+know+goes+there+pretty+often%2C+so+I+knew+I%E2%80%99d+be+able+to+see+a+lot+of+people+from+school.+It+annoys+me+when+my+friends+are+getting+snow+cones+together%2C+and+I+can%E2%80%99t+be+with+them+because+I%E2%80%99m+working.%E2%80%9D
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Working on their time off, a summer job profile

Handing a snow cone to a customer, employee and junior Audrey DeYoung fulfills her childhood dream of working at Tropical Sno Manchester, where she makes minimum wage. To reach a teenage demographic, DeYoung and her coworker created the Instagram account @trosnomanchester in hopes of having more teenagers drop by as customers. “What drew me to it was that it’s such a little shack and kind of a unique job to have,” DeYoung said. “Everyone I know goes there pretty often, so I knew I’d be able to see a lot of people from school. It annoys me when my friends are getting snow cones together, and I can’t be with them because I’m working.”

Handing a snow cone to a customer, employee and junior Audrey DeYoung fulfills her childhood dream of working at Tropical Sno Manchester, where she makes minimum wage. To reach a teenage demographic, DeYoung and her coworker created the Instagram account @trosnomanchester in hopes of having more teenagers drop by as customers. “What drew me to it was that it’s such a little shack and kind of a unique job to have,” DeYoung said. “Everyone I know goes there pretty often, so I knew I’d be able to see a lot of people from school. It annoys me when my friends are getting snow cones together, and I can’t be with them because I’m working.”

Courtesy of Audrey DeYoung

Handing a snow cone to a customer, employee and junior Audrey DeYoung fulfills her childhood dream of working at Tropical Sno Manchester, where she makes minimum wage. To reach a teenage demographic, DeYoung and her coworker created the Instagram account @trosnomanchester in hopes of having more teenagers drop by as customers. “What drew me to it was that it’s such a little shack and kind of a unique job to have,” DeYoung said. “Everyone I know goes there pretty often, so I knew I’d be able to see a lot of people from school. It annoys me when my friends are getting snow cones together, and I can’t be with them because I’m working.”

Courtesy of Audrey DeYoung

Courtesy of Audrey DeYoung

Handing a snow cone to a customer, employee and junior Audrey DeYoung fulfills her childhood dream of working at Tropical Sno Manchester, where she makes minimum wage. To reach a teenage demographic, DeYoung and her coworker created the Instagram account @trosnomanchester in hopes of having more teenagers drop by as customers. “What drew me to it was that it’s such a little shack and kind of a unique job to have,” DeYoung said. “Everyone I know goes there pretty often, so I knew I’d be able to see a lot of people from school. It annoys me when my friends are getting snow cones together, and I can’t be with them because I’m working.”

Working on their time off, a summer job profile

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  • Scanning the water at the North Pointe Aquatic Center, lifeguard and sophomore Ashleigh Morelli takes on the responsibility of potentially saving someone’s life. Though she enjoys her duties, Morelli also chose to work at the pool because it gave her a hands on experience with interacting with people, whether they are patrons or coworkers. “This job can help me in the future. [I show] leadership skills by giving directions and implementing rules while I work,” Morelli said. “It [taught] teamwork and how to work together in stressful or scary situations.”

  • Sorting out a minor dispute between two campers, day camp counselor and junior Tommy Hayek attempts to distract the boys by describing nature around Queeny Park. Despite being paid less than minimum wage, Hayek applied for the job because he attended the camp when he was younger and enjoyed playing games outside all day. “I get to organize games that I can actually make kids play. Trying to organize games with your friends can be tough since they all have plans, but these kids have to play,” Hayek said. “Most of them enjoy it, but the thing I dislike the most is when kids don’t want to play when they haven’t even tried.”

  • Working the register at the Quiznos franchise owned by her parents, senior Charlize Chiu builds her social skills to gain experience for future jobs. When faced with customers with bad attitudes, Chiu looked at it as an opportunity to improve her reasoning and problem solving skills. “Once when I was working the drive through, a man was yelling at me because he said the sandwiches were $6.60 on the menu, but we were charging him $7.10,” Chiu said. “I reasoned with him and kindly told him we could go check the pricing for him [because] some sandwiches have different prices than others. I [offered] to make him another sandwich which [did cost] $6.60.”

    Courtesy of Charlize Chiu

  • Coaxing his student to jump in the pool, Parkway Swim Club Swim School instructor and junior Charlie Creely uses the skills he gained through competing in swim to introduce it to the next generation. Though Creely made $10 per hour, he believed the experiences with the children provided the real reward. “I worked with one kid who, in the beginning, was afraid to even get in the water. [However,] after three six-week sessions he was doing full laps across the pool,” Creely said. “It taught me that as long as you put effort and time into your work, you can make a difference in someone else’s life.”

    Courtesy of Charlie Creely

  • Grading worksheets, Eye Level tutor and senior Beatrice Antonenko prepares to explain how to efficiently complete the exercises in the workbook to her student. Antonenko enjoyed helping students with their reading and writing skills despite the lower wages she made. “It’s a really rewarding job,” Antonenko said. “When something you say really clicks with a kid and they get a better understanding, [they] even start to enjoy reading or writing.”

    Courtesy of Beatrice Antonenko

  • As her shift winds down, senior Umeera Farooq sweeps the floors of the kitchen at Jimmy John’s, a fast food sandwich chain. Having previously dealt with phone anxiety, stress resulting from having conversations over the phone, Farooq believes the laid back work environment helped her face her worries head on. “I have to socialize with people I don’t normally [socialize with] and just learn how to talk to people. This environment just forces me to talk on the phone,” Farooq said. “Even though I do not want to go into the food industry, the skills I’ve learned and will continue to learn are lifelong skills and will be super beneficial in all aspects going forward.”

    Courtesy of Umeera Farooq

  • Capturing nature pictures in between shoots, sophomore Sammy Hildebrand enjoys running SLH Photos (@slhphotos_), her own photography business. Hildebrand believes experimenting with photography has helped her improve the quality of and combine two things she loves: business and photography. “I’m working toward growing my photography business and working within the marketing field,” Hildebrand said. “[I enjoy] that I get to be able to have creative freedom [because] I’m self-employed. Developing my own sense of style within my art is crucial keep pushing ahead [and] to not be stuck using someone else’s ideas.”

    Courtesy of Samantha Hildebrand

  • Handing a snow cone to a customer, employee and junior Audrey DeYoung fulfills her childhood dream of working at Tropical Sno Manchester, where she makes minimum wage. To reach a teenage demographic, DeYoung and her coworker created the Instagram account @trosnomanchester in hopes of having more teenagers drop by as customers. “What drew me to it was that it’s such a little shack and kind of a unique job to have,” DeYoung said. “Everyone I know goes there pretty often, so I knew I’d be able to see a lot of people from school. It annoys me when my friends are getting snow cones together, and I can’t be with them because I’m working.”

    Courtesy of Audrey DeYoung

  • Ringing a customer out at Cafe Kudu at the St. Louis Zoo, senior LaTasia Brooks makes $10.30 an hour with benefits. Working at the Zoo helped Brooks realize the value of empathy and patience. “The moms are constantly trying to do multiple things at once. I used to get so frustrated when they asked questions about where to pay or about things otherwise clearly stated,” Brooks said. “However, after working there for awhile, I realized everything they had on their plate when they walked through those doors. It helped me be more understanding and patient because I’ll never know what’s going through someone else’s mind or what they’re dealing with.”

    Courtesy of LaTasia Brooks

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