Class of 2015 awarded millions in scholarships

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Class of 2015 awarded millions in scholarships

Image courtesy of collegescholarships.org

Image courtesy of collegescholarships.org

Image courtesy of collegescholarships.org

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The class of 2015 has just wrapped up four years of high school and is moving on to the next stage of their lives. To help them transition into their new lives, the senior class was awarded a total of about $13.2 million in scholarships.

“Most of these scholarships were awarded directly from a university or college to the student and are renewable, covering all four years of college, and usually the student has to maintain a minimum GPA or some other requirement,” College and Career Center Secretary Katie Christensen said.

Most scholarships are awarded on GPA, ACT and SAT scores or a combination of both.

“There are two main types of scholarships: automatic and competitive. Automatic scholarships are usually based solely on grades and test scores, while competitive scholarships consider the student as a whole. Competitive scholarships take into account extracurriculars, leadership, volunteer work, and other criteria,” Christensen said. “Earning a scholarship is a long and difficult process, but it is unique to each student. Everything from academic record to sports, extracurriculars, service projects, financial need and other major components can make someone a candidate to be awarded money.”

Senior Claire Webster earned scholarships from all eleven schools she applied to.

“I worked for scholarships because college is so expensive, especially for me because I looked mainly at private schools,” Webster said. “A lot of times I would be awarded about $20,000, and that would still only cover half of my tuition. I’m relieved that a portion of my cost is covered, but still a little stressed because I know there is so much more to pay for.”

As a student who has gone through the process firsthand, Webster has some advice for students who will be looking for scholarships in the future.

“I would advise everyone to apply for [all scholarships], it will be worth it,” Webster said. “There are so many organizations you don’t even think of, and it’s basically like free money floating out there. In today’s world, at least a bachelor’s is necessary, if not a master’s, so try and get as much paid for so you can continue school as much as you can.”

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