“The Divergent Series: Insurgent” review

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“The Divergent Series: Insurgent” review

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Insurgent: a person, place, or thing that rebels against legal authority. This title justly describes the theme of this movie in one word. However, it doesn’t describe what the problem is. That, I can do for you: it’s more so the social conflict of freedom of thought and monotony. While this is the usual theme used in dystopian stories, this seems to be one of the few, other than Hunger Games and Maze Runner, that is a series. 1984, Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451 are all great dystopian stories, but are limited to just one book; not too short, but definitely making their points about society.

Even though some people are tired of all of these sequels, prequels and so on in books nowadays, I think they can work, as long as each story has its own conflict and resolution. If that weren’t the case, then the purpose of having a sequel would just drag out the already completed story, and that is tiring. The Divergent Series works, not only in having a new conflict for each novel, but also for its creative titles based on each next work.

First off, there are the names given to each of the factions, which are all of them heavily descriptive nouns. Then there are the titles, which do the same and are needed to explain the culmination of this future’s history. The first story, Divergent, gives the background of the communities laws and structure, and main character Tris’ struggle with that as soon discovers her divergence in character. Now the second story, Insurgent, has debuted in theatres everywhere: the story of how the Divergent’s fought back.

The Divergent Series Youtube channel

While the book undoubtedly has more content, the movie has detail you can’t get from author Veronica Roth’s descriptions. The simulation room is a prime example of that, with its high-tec computers, holograms, and the highly unnerving simulation wires. These thick, black wires are aggressive, with needles infused with simulation shots. This contraption is all for the one Divergent who can open a secret box from beyond their world’s walls.

Other than that futuristic room, there are other places filled with holograms as well. Holograms of the Erudite leader, Jeannine, emblazon themselves on buildings all over the city; the remaining Dauntless faction, whom are now hunting Divergent’s, are now accosted with handheld Divergent trackers. But before I delve too deeply into those details, I should also talk about the characters and those who played them.

Main star, Shailene Woodley, who plays Tris Prior, is amazing! While small, she pulls off Tris’ tough girl attitude as if it were second nature. Tobias Eaton (Four), who’s played by Theo James, is also a well done role. In his reunion with his “dead” mom, the audience gets a glimpse at Eaton’s broken relationship with his mom. James’ acting was so spot on that it felt like I was watching an argument play out from the past. The last star who was truly a star has got to be Miles Teller as Peter.  Broken out unwillingly from his place in Dauntless by Tris and Four, this guy is as difficult and annoying as he could possibly get. However, you can’t help but laugh at how trivial he is compared to the real problem with the war on Divergent’s. He was like an annoying little brother and it was perfect comic relief–almost as if he was in denial of what was happening or could care less.

Summit Entertainment never fails to amaze with the films it produces, from teen flicks like Twilight and Warm Bodies, to thrillers like the Darkest Hour and Escape Plan. Their iconic mountain logo prefaces something surreal and mysterious; whenever I see their company’s logo, I know I’m going to be in for an adventure. The Divergent Series: Insurgent not only takes you on an adventure, it leaves its beautiful images in your mind as if they were memories of your own. Director Robert Schwentke hasn’t directed many sci-fi movies, but this one should bring his popularity up a notch. However, Divergent’s details were more involved than this sequel, thanks to director Neil Burger, whom directed Limitless and the Illusionist. Besides the sad fact that, not only has Burger not directed Insurgent, but will not direct Allegiant, I still wasn’t disappointed with this movie. It’s an adventure you won’t regret!

Parkway West Pathfinder gives “The Divergent Series: Insurgent” 7.5/10.