The Official Student News Site of Parkway West High

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The Official Student News Site of Parkway West High

Pathfinder

The Official Student News Site of Parkway West High

Pathfinder

Flashback Friday: Family and consumer sciences teacher Katie Hashley

Family+and+Consumer+Sciences+teacher+Katie+Hashley+stands+beside+a+plate+of+cookies+in+front+of+her+kitchen.+Hashley+wanted+to+be+a+teacher+from+an+early+age%2C+but+worked+10+years+in+the+restaurant+industry+before+she+pursued+the+career.+%E2%80%9CI+started+imagining+being+a+teacher+when+I+was+in+third+grade.+At+that+time%2C+I+wanted+to+teach+elementary+school%2C+but+as+I+got+older+and+matured+and+thought+more+about+my+career%2C+I+realized+that+wasnt+the+group+that+I+would+work+best+with.+I+went+back+and+forth+in+college+on+what+I+wanted+to+do%2C+and+in+the+end%2C+I+%5Bknew%5D+high+school+was+it+for+me.+I+also+worked+in+restaurants+for+10+years+so+%5Bteaching%5D+Culinary+Arts+was+a+natural+transition+%5Bfrom%5D+that%2C%E2%80%9D+Hashley+said.+
Sakenah Lajkem
Family and Consumer Sciences teacher Katie Hashley stands beside a plate of cookies in front of her kitchen. Hashley wanted to be a teacher from an early age, but worked 10 years in the restaurant industry before she pursued the career. “I started imagining being a teacher when I was in third grade. At that time, I wanted to teach elementary school, but as I got older and matured and thought more about my career, I realized that wasn’t the group that I would work best with. I went back and forth in college on what I wanted to do, and in the end, I [knew] high school was it for me. I also worked in restaurants for 10 years so [teaching] Culinary Arts was a natural transition [from] that,” Hashley said.

 

FACS teacher Katie Hashley (right) talks with her teacher. Growing up, Hashley always adored her teachers. “They were celebrities to me — specifically, my third-grade teacher, Mrs. Beckett. If I saw them at the store, I was starstruck. In third grade, I realized I had some learning difficulties [with] reading comprehension and writing. [Mrs. Beckett] really pushed me, motivated me and helped me overcome these difficulties [to] perform at grade level. By the end, [I was] even above grade level. Her helping me in the ways that I needed to be helped was very inspiring,” Hashley said. (Photo courtesy of Katie Hashley)

What school did you go to?

I grew up in St. Louis County and attended Oakville Elementary. Then, I went to Oakville Junior High. I graduated from Oakville Senior High.

 

How was your childhood home life?

[My homelife] was good. I am the youngest of four children. My mom was a stay-at-home mom and my dad worked, so we had a pretty traditional family for that time period. One thing that was always really special was that my mom volunteered at my school quite a bit. When we were in the younger grades — kindergarten, first grade, second grade —  my mom would get to read to our class, so it was kind of like my mom was part of our school. I loved having her at school and all of my friends loved her too.

FACS teacher Katie Hashley poses with a soccer ball and a picture of her cat. Hashley brought the items for a show-and-tell activity. “I brought my soccer ball, because at that time, soccer was everything to me,” Hashley said. “As for the picture, growing up, the only pet we had was this cat. She was my sister’s cat and she was the meanest cat in the world. She always hissed at us and wasn’t nice at all. We liked her, but I remember her being really mean to us. This picture just cracks me up because now I look at that vest and I’m like, ‘Man, that thing is so ugly,’ but when I saw it at the mall at that time, I was like ‘I have to have that.’ Everybody wore vests in 1993, so it was definitely a fashion statement [to wear one] with license plates on it.” (Photo courtesy of Katie Hashley)

What has changed, what hasn’t?

Technology has changed how children are raised quite a bit. We did not have access to much technology in my childhood and my parents wanted us out of the house, so I had a group of friends that I played outside with constantly. When the streetlights came on, we knew when we had to come [home]. Our kids today play inside more; they have access to a lot more technology to entertain them. They don’t spend as much time with their peers as they might if everyone didn’t have access to so much technology.

 

Tell me a childhood story that always makes you smile. 

When I was six years old, we moved from Washington, Mo. to South County, Mo. The first day that we moved into our house, I was out in the front yard, playing with my dolls while my parents were putting

FACS teacher Katie Hashley smiles for a picture before a dance recital. Hashley danced until fourth grade before switching to soccer. “We were in line getting ready to perform. The dance company was named Miss Cindy’s Dance Studio and my older sister also danced with me. I liked it, but my parents would only let us be in one activity. When I really wanted to play soccer, [I had to choose] dance or soccer, and I was ready to make a change. This [picture] was [from] my last year dancing,” Hashley said.

boxes in the house, and a little girl just rode her bike right on up to where I was playing. She was like, ‘Can I play with you?’ Her name is Sarah, and her and I are best friends to this day. We’re going on a trip to Alaska in June together. It’s just interesting how someone [can] come out of nowhere and ask you to play and [soon] you’re friends with them forever.

What things make you nostalgic when you see/hear/smell/ feel them?

The mall. I know that teenagers today probably do not spend time at the mall like we did in the 90s, but if I just walk into a shopping mall — if I’m in Macy’s and I smell perfume or Auntie Anne’s —  it makes me think of all the great times I had with my friends when we went shopping. Iit was pretty much a regular occurrence, either on a Friday or Saturday night. My core group of friends, we would go shopping, hit our favorite stores and go to the merry-go-round. A lot of us ended up having mall jobs because we just loved going there so much. It makes me sad that so many [malls] are closing down and that teenagers don’t have the appreciation that we had for them at that time.

 

 

 

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About the Contributor
Sakenah Lajkem, Staff Writer
Pronouns: she/her Grade: 12 Years on staff: 2 What is your favorite piece of literature? Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz. Who is your hero? Jesus Christ. If you could only eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be? My mom's mashed potatoes.
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