Black History Month takes a different route

Performing+an+original+piece%2C+senior+Taylor+Fischer+raps+for+students+attending+the+African+American+Read-In+in+the+library.

Bri Davis

Performing an original piece, senior Taylor Fischer raps for students attending the African American Read-In in the library.

As you walk past business teacher Kelly Kennedy’s door, you’ll see a large painting of an African American woman wearing a crown on her afro hair to show how black is beautiful.

To promote Black History Month students decorated teachers’ doors with both female and male African American history to be entered into a contest. 

“I am in charge of door decorations as the president of ASAP. Some teachers are using sponsors and clubs to help with their door, a lot of people have asked ASAP to help out with decorations now more than ever,” senior and ASAP President Tia Reed said. “People need to know our history and I feel like ASAP is where it needs to start. We need to be the ones who tell what’s going on and how we’re feeling [through these activities].” 

People need to know our history and I feel like ASAP is where it needs to start. We need to be the ones who tell what’s going on and how we’re feeling [through these activities],”

— senior Tia Reed

In addition to door decorations, the library hosted the African American Read-In, where students read poems and other literature by African American authors. 

“The idea was to promote literacy, essentially, but also cultural literacy. I hope that students of all races feel welcomed to come—something that I was trying to strive for is not just to promote African Americans but all races,” Librarian Brian Welch said. 

ASAP members also had students and teachers hold up a sign with their dream to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to post on a Black History Month Instagram campaign.

“[I shared] my dream.  [I hope] we can each begin where we are to help build a better, more united community, secretary for the junior class Tammy Araya said. “[My post said] ‘Quit talking, Begin Doing.’ We are all people, no matter the color of our hair, skin or eyes. We should look around us and strengthen our fellowmen. We shouldn’t judge one another. It is better to offer someone your hand rather than pointing a finger at them. It is time to reach out and lift one another.”  

During the balance of the month, Black History Month will continue to be recognized with activities and daily trivia that the student body can participate in. 

“[I hope] that we can look at each other as equals. Because that is what we truly are: equals,” Araya said.